NaNoWriMo

5 Lessons Learned from Completing #NaNoWriMo

I entered NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) on a whim. I wasn’t going to for a couple reasons. The first…

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17 thoughts on “5 Lessons Learned from Completing #NaNoWriMo

  1. katina vaselopulos
    Twitter:

    A wonderful and encouraging post, Stacy! There are indeed great lessons to learn from participating in NaNo.

    I joined in after TW Kath Unsworth invited me. Then passed the last 2 weeks of October regretting my decision. I am not a fiction writer and had no idea what was going to do, when luckily I read about having the choice to be a rebel. Inspired by TW Shelley DuPont, I decided to write my memoirs and the lessons life taught me. At the age of 68, I can have many memories and learned many lessons!

    Blessings of inspiration!

    I enjoyed writing 2-3 hours most of the days and finished yesterday with 50,338 words. Lots more to add later on and then edit, edit, and more edit. It ha s been an experience and I would suggest t hat to anyone, even if they do not think of themselves as writers. Anyone can descover a hidden love for writing.

    Reply
  2. katina vaselopulos
    Twitter:

    A wonderful and encouraging post, Stacy! There are indeed great lessons to learn from participating in NaNo.

    I joined in after TW Kath Unsworth invited me. Then passed the last 2 weeks of October regretting my decision. I am not a fiction writer and had no idea what was going to do, when luckily I read about having the choice to be a rebel. Inspired by TW Shelley DuPont, I decided to write my memoirs and the lessons life taught me. At the age of 68, I can have many memories and learned many lessons!

    I enjoyed writing 2-3 hours most of the days and finished yesterday with 50,338 words. Lots more to add later on and then edit, edit, and more edit. It ha s been an experience and I would suggest t hat to anyone, even if they do not think of themselves as writers. Anyone can descover a hidden love for writing.

    Blessings of inspiration!

    Reply
  3. Tony Nguyen

    Hi, Stacy Claflin!
    I love this post. The article is informative and useful. I do follow your articles recently. Love the way you write your posts. After reading this article, I think I have some ideas for myself. Thanks for sharing this post. Hope to read more interesting information from you. Great job!

    Reply
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  5. Megan Kerr
    Twitter:

    A really good post. Over the summer, I’ve found that writing by hand has helped to break free from the editing impulse. I write a mixture of literary and fantasy fiction, and the literary impulse can paralyse me sometimes. I find that by writing faster, I’m getting far better sentence flow and even getting fresher imagery. Though of course it does need editing!

    Reply
      1. Megan Kerr
        Twitter:

        Hi Stacey – more likely you need a better pen! Ballpoint pens work by using friction, so using them a lot will always make your wrist sore (as well as your handwriting messier). Gel pens write very smoothly but the ink runs out so fast that they end up being absurdly expensive, and you never want to be holding back on words because of the expense. Fountain pens are ideal – and don’t have to be crazy-pricey – plus the ink glistening as it comes out the nib makes you want to just keep writing. Don’t let anyone else use your fountain pen, though, cos the more you use it, the more the nib shapes itself to your handwriting.

        Reply
  6. Pingback: Why You Aren’t Writing More…And What You Can Do About It

  7. Pingback: Camp NaNoWriMo – Writing a Novel in April

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